Fall 2017: Reading the Genesis Creation Stories Again For The First Time

Genesis-garden-of-eden

Garden of Eden in Genesis

 

Reading the Genesis Creation Stories Again For The First Time (Fall, 2017)

NOTE: This course is being given under the auspices of the University of Montana’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The complete translations of both Genesis creation accounts are available as a downloadable PDF in which is also included a course schedule (syllabus) and links to a set of recommended readings.

Since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bible scholars have uncovered a wealth of new findings, many of which have profoundly deepened and extended our understanding of the two biblical creation stories. Here are just four of many examples that will be examined in the course.

  • Example 1: in the mid-20th century significant narratives in the Hebrew Bible came to be recognized as written using literary forms such as chaismus, poetry, allegory, and metaphor. The first and second creation stories are just two such narratives and, when read and recognized as largely symbolic in nature, they reveal a depth of meaning not heretofore appreciated. At the same time, the conventional understanding of these two famous narratives is not damaged, but extended and made deeper and more meaningful.
  • Example 2: many scholars now understand that time played no part in the first creation story. Put another way, the question of what measure of time the author used to describe God’s creation – days, epochs, millenia, or billions of years – is irrelevant because, read correctly, it took no time at all. In effect, many scientists and creationists have it wrong.
  • Example 3: we know from recent advances in linguistics as well as ancient Hebrew literary forms that the first creation story portrays the universe as having been created from preexisting material.
  • Example 4: many scholars now believe that the Garden of Eden story was written not to describe the Fall of Man and original sin. Rather, the story of Adam and Eve is one of immortality lost and procreativity gained. Ultimately, the story reveals the concomitant pain and triumph that free will and moral choice impose on the mortal life.

I will be teaching directly from the Hebrew text and incorporating the results of the most recent (and peer-reviewed) scholarship. Knowledge of biblical Hebrew is not required.

NOTE: I am a teacher, not a biblical scholar1)A biblical scholar rightly understood, is someone who conducts research and submits his/her findings to peer review. And, while my formal education is similar to that of a biblical scholar, I do not conduct original research and write my findings for peer review.. I survey the findings of scholars, weigh their arguments (and, boy, do they argue) and then conform my conclusions for a lay audience. Finally, I am mindful that biblical scholarship is often controversial and students need to be exposed to these controversies.

By way of further background, modern scholarship has revealed2)Especially since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1948, that the Genesis creation stories are best understood as high literary art – art in which the ancient authors conveyed God’s revelations using poetry, high prose, and symbolism – both allegorical and metaphorical.

Over the course of these six classes participants will be introduced to a view of the Bible that is inestimably deeper, richer, and more stimulating compared to what is usually taught in Sunday school, adult Bible classes, and even Seminary. Participants WILL come away from these classes with a keen understanding of why the Bible is often described as the greatest book ever written.

To request additional information, feel free to contact me at mtpeterson1948@gmail.com.

The classes will be challenging — not so much by their intellectual depth but because the focus is what the text would have meant to its intended audience, the ancient Hebrews – a people with radically different world-views when compared with modern Western cultures. To this end, we will engage the ancient cultures, languages, and traditions of the peoples of those ancient days. With this context in mind, we will examine what God originally intended to reveal to His chosen people.

References   [ + ]

1. A biblical scholar rightly understood, is someone who conducts research and submits his/her findings to peer review. And, while my formal education is similar to that of a biblical scholar, I do not conduct original research and write my findings for peer review.
2. Especially since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1948

3 Responses to Fall 2017: Reading the Genesis Creation Stories Again For The First Time

  1. Pingback: Biblical Creation Class Begins - Class Resources - Thus Said The LORDThus Said The LORD

  2. Pingback: The Enuma Elish - The Predecessor For Genesis Creation - Thus Said The LORDThus Said The LORD

  3. Veronica says:

    Can you tell us more about this? I’d want to find out more details.

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